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Clemson University breakthrough in self-healing materials detailed in journal Science

The cost of making plastics, paints, coatings for cell phone screens and other materials that heal themselves like skin could be dramatically reduced thanks to a breakthrough that a Clemson University team detailed in the latest edition of the journal Science.

Marek Urban and his team wrote about how they were able to give self-healing qualities to polymers that are used in relatively inexpensive commodities, such as paints, plastics and coatings. The next step is to go from making small amounts in a lab to producing large quantities.

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Marek Urban works in his lab with his students at the Advanced Materials Research Lab.

“It’s not available at the industrial scale, but it’s very close,” said Urban, who is the J.E. Sirrine Foundation Chair and Professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Clemson.

Researchers have been making small batches of self-healing polymers for the last two decades, but producing them on a commercial scale has so far been largely cost prohibitive.

Urban said he and his team took advantage of interactions between co-polymers that he likened to spaghetti strands with little brushes on the side.

The longer the spaghetti strands get, the more they become entangled, he said. The side groups interlock like two interlaced hands, making it harder to pull them apart, Urban said.

What’s significant about his latest breakthrough is that if a company wanted to bring the technology to market, it would no longer have to build a new factory to produce self-healing polymers, Urban said.

The article is titled “‘Key-and-lock’ commodity self-healing copolymers’ and marks the second time since 2009 that Urban has detailed his work on self-healing polymers in Science. Co-authors on the more recent article are Dmitriy Davydovich, Ying Yang, Tugba Demir, Yunzhi Zhang and Leah Casabianca, all of Clemson University.

Rajendra Bordia, chair of the department of materials science and engineering at Clemson, congratulated Urban and his research team.

The research that led to the article was funded by the National Science Foundation.


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