News Archives: April, 2016

POSITION VACANCY: Director, South Carolina EPSCoR/IDeA State Office

Posted on

Dear EPSCoR/IDeA Coalition and Foundation Board Members,

The South Carolina EPSCoR program is currently seeking candidates for the position of Director of the South Carolina EPSCoR/IDeA State Office.  Attached is additional information about the position.  If you know of individuals who would be good candidates, please note that:

  • INTERESTED APPLICANTS SHOULD SUBMIT A COVER LETTER AND COMPLETE CV TO:  Ms. Molly Laporte, Manager, SC EPSCoR/IDeA State Office, laportem@mailbox.sc.edu
  • QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: Dr. John Wheeler, Interim Director, SC EPSCoR/IDeA State Office, wheelejf@mailbox.sc.edu, (864) 294-3371 (Furman), (803) 777-9221 (Columbia)

Many thanks,

Jessica

Read more

12 UK students, alumni win NSF research fellowships

Posted on

The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that 12 of the university's students and alumni have been selected to receive government-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. The fellowships award more than $100,000 to use toward research-based master's or doctoral degrees. In addition, four other UK students and alumni received honorable mention recognition from the NSF.

This year's selection of a dozen UK students and alumni for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships is believed to be the largest in the school's history and is four times the number of selections for 2015. To put more of emphasis on the fellowship, Pat Whitlow, director of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, hosted an informational luncheon last fall with current fellowship recipients for students interested in the program.
 
"The goal was to encourage more undergraduate and graduate students to apply for the NSF GRFP because we believe UK students are underrepresented as recipients of this major national award. We are delighted with the strong results we achieved in this award cycle," Whitlow said.
 
The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the U.S. and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based graduate degrees in the U.S. and abroad.

Read more

NSF graduate research fellows

Posted on

The National Science Foundation has named two University of Delaware undergraduate students and one alumnus to its list of 2016 Graduate Research Fellows, providing financial support for their continuing studies.

Read more

MDI Biological Laboratory awarded grant to study aging

Posted on

The MDI Biological Laboratory has announced that it has received a grant to support a new course on aging that will draw internationally renowned scientists to Bar Harbor, Maine, to examine fundamental questions about our ability to repair and regenerate tissue as we age.

The $20,000 grant from the Glenn Foundation For Medical Research will be used to help offset the cost of tuition for an intensive two-week research training course entitled "Comparative and Experimental Approaches to Aging Biology Research" to be held at the institution June 19 to July 3.

Read more

Grants yield new opportunities in chemistry

Posted on

Chemistry students at Arkansas Tech University are the beneficiaries of two recent grants totaling $3,000 from Entergy and its associated entities.

“The equipment we have purchased with the grants has expanded our capabilities in providing hands-on learning for every student,” said Dr. Newton Hilliard, associate professor of chemistry at Arkansas Tech. “It’s no longer a case of having one piece of equipment and using it for demonstration. We’ve been able to acquire classroom sets of bench-top equipment.”

The Arkansas Tech Department of Physical Sciences has received a $2,000 grant from the Entergy Charitable Foundation and a $1,000 grant from Entergy Arkansas in recent months.

Hilliard said that the funds have also allowed the department to direct existing resources toward matching grants through the Arkansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (AR-INBRE) for additional high-end equipment.

“These tables were blank two years ago,” said Hilliard, pointing toward a laboratory now filled with science equipment. “The grants have been leveraged for even greater goals.”

Read more

NASA awards student-led team to develop lightning gamma-ray instrument

Posted on

NASA has awarded a Louisiana Space Grant Consortium, or LaSPACE, research team at LSU a grant to develop an instrument that would fly into a thunderstorm to measure how lightning can produce high energy gamma-rays. The student-led project called, Correlation of Terrestrial gamma flashes, Electric fields and Lightning strikes, or COTEL, is one of 39 projects selected by the NASA Office of Education through the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project, or USIP, program. COTEL has been awarded a $200,000 grant.

Read more

Phosphorus ‘tax’ could be huge if tropical farming intensifies

Posted on

One way to feed the globe’s growing population is to ramp up intensive farming in tropical regions, but doing so will require a lot of fertilizer — particularly phosphorus. This is not only because it is often present at very low levels in tropical soils, but also because many of these soils bind added phosphorus fertilizer, making it less available to crops.

A new study in Nature Plants estimates that intensifying farming on the world’s phosphorus (P) binding soils could annually sequester in soil 1 to 4 million metric tons of P fertilizer. For comparison, approximately 2 million metric tons of fertilizer phosphorus are used in North America each year.

Furthermore, the authors found that even after fertilizing for decades, farmers on P-binding soils will still be forced to pay this “P-tax” every year, tying their success or failure to the production, distribution and cost of a finite resource found largely in just a handful of locations around the world. By 2050, the “P-tax” could double if the expansion of the world’s tropical cropland area continues.

Eric Roy, now an assistant professor at the University of Vermont, led the study with his former advisor at Brown University, Associate Professor Stephen Porder. They and a team of colleagues at Brown and in Brazil interviewed farmers in Mato Grosso, Brazil, a state with very poor soils that has become a global agricultural powerhouse by using large quantities of phosphorus fertilizer. Farmer surveys, and Brazilian government statistics, suggest that even after decades of fertilizer inputs in excess of what is taken up by crops, these P-binding soils still sequester about 50 percent of the phosphorus fertilizer added.

Read more

Intensive framing in the tropics could require huge phosphorous 'tax'

Posted on

From the Amazon to Africa, tropical regions are widely expected to play a growing role in supplying food to the world. With global population on the rise, many policy experts and conservationists see agricultural intensification as a winning strategy to produce more food per acre while sparing tropical forests from being converted to farmland. Just pour on the fertilizer.

But a new study in Nature Plants raises a grave concern: if tropical countries try to meet rising global demand for food by turning to intensive farming techniques, it will require vast amounts of phosphorus fertilizer — which must be mined from phosphate rock, a limited natural resource.

Read more

WEBINAR: Understanding SBIR & STTR Phase I application process

Posted on

The NSF Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) program seeks to transform scientific discovery into societal and economic benefit by catalyzing private sector commercialization of technological innovations. The program increases the incentive and opportunity for startups and small businesses to undertake cutting-edge, high-quality scientific research and development. 

We provide grants in phases: a proof-of-concept / feasibility grant (6-12 months, $225k) can potentially be followed by a longer development grant (2 years, $750k).

Join this webinar to learn more about what you need to submit an application for Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) funding.  SBIR Program Director Peter Atherton will walk you through the process and answer questions.

Read more
ex arrow-right check news twitter facebook