News & Updates

How to catch the biggest wave in the universe

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When it comes to waves, it doesn't get much bigger than the gravitational variety. 

Einstein predicted that huge events — like black holes merging — create gravitational waves. Unlike most waves we experience, these are distortions in space and time. They roll across the entire universe virtually unimpeded.

Einstein first predicted the existence of gravitational waves in 1916, but none were spotted until recently. Given their incredible power, why did it take a century to locate them?

To find out, I went to see where the detection finally occurred. It's just off Interstate 12 in Livingston Parish, La. To get there you head through town, past the "Gold and Guns" pawn shop and up a country road. Turn onto an empty lane and eventually some low buildings emerge from a forest of gangly pine trees.

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A new generation of biomedical researchers presents at Converse College

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A new biosensor to help detect a genetic disease. The potentially carcinogenic effects of common herbicides. This sort of research may sound like the domain of large biomedical research labs, but it’s being conducted right here on the Converse campus. And some of the researchers aren’t old enough to drive.

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Montana State professor Brian Bothner named new director of Montana INBRE

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Montana State University professor Brian Bothner has been named the new director and principal investigator of the Montana IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence, or INBRE, program, effective July 1, 2016. He succeeds Allen Harmsen, who remains at MSU and has assumed the role of principal investigator for the American Indian-Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Research Program, a new research partnership funded by the National institutes of Health. Due to NIH guidelines, Harmsen cannot direct this grant and Montana INBRE at the same time.

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MSU and partners awarded $20 million grant ­­to address Native health disparities in Montana and Alaska

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Montana State University and several partners have received a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to address health disparities facing Native communities in Montana and Alaska, university officials announced Aug. 16.  

The new American Indian-Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Research Program includes collaborators from Blackfeet Community College, the University of Montana, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Alaska Anchorage, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and the Southcentral Foundation.

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WV-INBRE program brings faculty and student researchers across the state to WVU and Marshall for research experience

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Brandon Sellers, a senior biology and chemistry major from Davis & Elkins College, has been interested in science for as long as he can remember. After learning about the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence program from two faculty members at Davis & Elkins, Sellers applied to the program and traveled to West Virginia University this summer to take his research skills to the next level.

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URI student plumbs depths of Napatree lagoon

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University of Rhode Island senior Hannah Madison, pictured left, is spending her summer elbow-deep in seaweed at the Napatree Point lagoon working to assess the seasonal variability of algae blooms and how it relates to water quality.

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Cat scat: Research at the University of Delaware examines food habits of snow leopards

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While studying snow leopard scat is one of the least invasive ways to look at what the animals are eating and gauge their food preferences, according to a new UD study it may not always be the most accurate. Researchers found that past food-habit studies on snow leopards could have been biased by the inclusion of non-target species in fecal analysis, potentially misinforming managers about the prey requirements that allow snow leopard populations to succeed.

The research was led by Sarah Weiskopf, who recently received her master's degree from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and who did the work as part of her undergraduate senior thesis; Kyle McCarthy, assistant professor of wildlife ecology; and Shannon Kachel, a graduate student who works with McCarthy. The findings were published in the Wildlife Society Bulletin.

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