News & Updates

New approach from WVU study measures how much carbon dioxide comes from mine drainage

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The collective estimated amount of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere from 140 coal mines across Pennsylvania is the equivalent to that of a small power plant, a new West Virginia University study finds.

Dorothy Vesper, associate professor in the Department of Geology and Geography at West Virginia University, and her research team, are using a meter designed for measuring carbon dioxide in beverages to more accurately measure the gas in mine drainage water. Using measurements from several sites and estimated values from United States Geological Survey data for 140 Pennsylvania mines, they've calculated the amount of carbon dioxide released from abandoned coal mines.

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NASA awards grants for university research and development programs

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NASA is awarding approximately $8 million to 11 schools across the country for research and technology development projects in areas critical to the agency's mission.

The Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) program supports science and technology research and development at colleges and universities in areas, such as remote sensing, nanotechnology, astrophysics and aeronautics. All of these are applicable to NASA's work in Earth science, aeronautics, and human and robotic deep space exploration. The schools will receive as much as $750,000 each for work during a three-year period.

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NSF announces 2016 EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track-1 awards

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The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Hawai'i, Nebraska and Vermont $20 million each through its Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), which promotes world-class research nationwide.

The five-year Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) Track-1 awards will bolster science and engineering research infrastructure at multiple institutions within each of the three states. The awards are aimed at expanding research frontiers and developing a diverse and nimble workforce trained in STEM disciplines through innovative combinations of research, education and public outreach.

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UA-Huntsville study asks, 'How much impact do genes have on behavior?'

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Efforts by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) researcher to better understand the genetic underpinnings of ecologically relevant behaviors have recently resulted in an award of $612,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

"This research will help us understand the genetic architecture of behaviors that are important to the evolution of species," says Dr. Matzkin, an assistant professor of biological science and the principal investigator for the three-year grant. "What we want to understand is how these behaviors develop, how they evolve and how they are manifested."

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NMSU-based NM FAST sends companies to national small business conference

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The New Mexico Federal and State Technology Partnership Program (NM FAST) recently sent several New Mexico companies to the National Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Conference held May 23-25 in Washington, D.C., with funding made available through the New Mexico Economic Development Department.

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Gravitational waves detected from second pair of colliding black holes

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On December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC, scientists observed gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of spacetime -- for the second time.

The gravitational waves were detected by both of the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington.

The LIGO Observatories are funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and were conceived, built and are operated by Caltech and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The discovery, accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review Letters, was made by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (which includes the the German/British collaboration for the detection of gravitational waves and the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy) and the Virgo Collaboration, using data from the two LIGO detectors.

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Turnable, twistable robots

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Forget steel and aluminum. The robots of tomorrow may be able to squish, stretch and squeeze.

Novel robotic devices, part of the emerging field of soft robotics, offer many advances over conventional robots. 

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UD researchers sharpen time, spatial control of reactions

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You could think of bioorthogonal chemistry as a discreet valet or concierge that steers two world leaders to a private meeting without making noise or trouble along the way.

The valet is a catalyst of sorts, arranging the meeting to expedite a result that would not otherwise happen.

Bioorthogonal chemistry produces targeted reactions within living organisms that would not happen naturally. It is used in nuclear medicine, in imaging of cells, and in creating materials or adjusting the properties of materials already present.

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RFI: Strategies for Modernizing Biomedical Graduate Education

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The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) seeks input on how to catalyze the modernization of biomedical graduate education through NIGMS’s institutional predoctoral training grants program. This Request for Information (RFI) will assist NIGMS in identifying, developing and potentially implementing strategies that will catalyze the modernization of graduate education at the national level to ensure that trainees gain the skills, abilities and knowledge required to be successful in the biomedical research workforce.

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